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The Vegan Cosmetic Trend: Everything You Need to Know

Vegan nail polish

The vegan trend in cosmetics has gained momentum in recent years. It is driven by increased consumer awareness of ethical and environmental issues. But what really lies behind this label, and how can you navigate through all the vegan cosmetics? We present the main aspects of this trend that is making its way into our bathrooms and offer tips for shopping for these products without getting fooled.

What is a vegan cosmetic?

A vegan cosmetic is a beauty product formulated without any animal-derived ingredients. That means no animal fats, no beeswax, no honey, and no milk. This practice goes beyond the absence of animal testing. Consuming vegan cosmetics is in line with veganism. It is a healthy lifestyle that opposes animal exploitation. It excludes any consumption of animal-derived products, such as leather or wool.

Using vegan cosmetic products is part of a healthy lifestyle
Using vegan cosmetic products is part of a healthy lifestyle

Understanding the vegan approach

The vegan movement is primarily known to the general public for its dietary approach. However, it is actually a deeper commitment that encompasses a global lifestyle. Veganism combats overconsumption and rejects the consumption of any product that relies on animal exploitation. Vegans are, in addition to food, sensitive to all products consumed daily. They pay particular attention to the composition of cosmetic products, which may contain animal-derived ingredients.

Consumers turn to vegan cosmetics for several reasons. From an ethical standpoint, these products oppose animal cruelty. From an environmental standpoint, their ecological footprint is reduced. Finally, for health, these products are natural and less likely to contain harmful chemicals.

Vegan cosmetics are against animal cruelty, have a positive environmental impact, and are good from an ethical standpoint
Vegan cosmetics are against animal cruelty, have a positive environmental impact, and are good from an ethical standpoint

The challenges of these products

The vegan cosmetics market is growing rapidly, with a significant increase in demand and supply. Many major brands, as well as small specialized companies, are launching vegan ranges to meet consumer expectations. However, some criticisms persist, notably greenwashing. Indeed, some companies claim their products are vegan without real transparency or commitment. Also, vegan products can sometimes be more expensive and less available than their non-vegan counterparts.

The benefits of adopting these vegan products

Opting for the use of this type of cosmetic means becoming more environmentally friendly. Becoming a regular consumer of vegan cosmetic products also allows for sorting. Indeed, most beauty products contain dangerous ingredients like parabens and silicones. Studies have shown that these ingredients cause endocrine disruptions. The best choice is to ban them and replace them with vegan products, which are more natural and whose benefits are well established.

So, becoming a fan of vegan cosmetics is advantageous. Moreover, it also means adopting new beauty habits like removing makeup with reusable cotton pads or simple washable microfiber wipes. For deep skin hydration, oils are sufficient: coconut oil or olive oil. Become vegan, at least in cosmetics, it’s all benefits!

Using vegan cosmetics offers many benefits, but it's important to adopt good practices
Using vegan cosmetics offers many benefits, but it’s important to adopt good practices

Reference labels for vegan cosmetic products: who to trust?

To recognize a vegan product, you must first read the labels to know what is vegan or not in the ingredients. However, today, no international regulation offers a reference for vegan cosmetics. Non-governmental organizations and associations have established references and labels that provide some rigor and good visibility.

  • EVE VEGAN: certificate of conformity for raw materials, products, and services related to the food, cosmetics, and textile sectors. This label guarantees the absence of animal-derived ingredients in the product or packaging and the total absence of animal testing.

  • VEGANCERT: non-governmental non-profit organization also guaranteeing the absence of animal-derived ingredients in the product and packaging but does not guarantee the absence of animal testing.

  • CRUELTY FREE AND VEGAN: association (PETA) advocating for animal rights offering this label, which guarantees a vegan product not tested on animals.

  • VEGAN ACTION: the stamped references are guaranteed without animal-derived ingredients and not tested on animals. It is a non-profit organization.

Labels can therefore be useful for clarity. All ban any animal-derived ingredient in the composition of the products.

Vegan cosmetics can be identified on the labels
Vegan cosmetics can be identified on the labels

Vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cosmetics: what are the differences?

These three terms are closely related but have very different notions and should not be confused.

  • Vegan cosmetic: contains no animal-derived ingredients and is not tested on animals.

  • Organic cosmetic: made with natural ingredients from organic farming but may contain animal materials like honey, as long as the products meet the criteria of their charter. An organic cosmetic is not tested on animals.

  • Cruelty-free cosmetic: guarantees the absence of animal testing but does not prohibit their presence in the products, such as fats, honey, or beeswax.

Only a certified vegan product can be used by a vegan person.

Ingredients to ban from your vegan beauty products

Animal-derived ingredients are quite common in cosmetics, but they must still be banned if you want to adopt vegan products. Here are a few:

  • All hive products: honey, propolis, beeswax often found in lip balms;
  • Milk, such as donkey milk used for skincare;
  • Lanolin: fat obtained from sheep’s wool with moisturizing and protective properties;
  • Collagen or keratin: derived from animal proteins;

Possible vegan alternatives include carnauba wax or candelilla wax (replacing beeswax), plant collagen (often derived from algae), and plant proteins (such as wheat keratin).

Some ingredients should be banned to adopt vegan cosmetics
Some ingredients should be banned to adopt vegan cosmetics

The vegan trend in cosmetics reflects a shift towards more ethical and sustainable practices. Adopting this trend means participating in a global movement towards a more respectful and sustainable world.